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Articles of Interest

Clan Campbell

Information
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Real information about the Clan Campbell
History
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Clan Campbell history, some things may surprise you.
Tartans
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
The four tartans of the Clan Campbell: Campbell, Campbell of Loudoun, Campbell of Breadalbane, Campbell of Cawdor.
Septs
Alistair Campbell of Airds, Unicorn Pursuivant of Arms
A History of Clan Campbell
Detailed information about the septs of Clan Campbell. Could you be part of Clan Campbell?
DNA Project
Kevin Campbell and Joel Campbell
Information about the Campbell DNA Project, a link to the Campbell DNA
Tales
Collected by CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Tales attributed to the Clan Campbell.
Music
Collected by CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Music attributed to the Clan Campbell.
Links
Compiled by the Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Links to various regions of the Clan Campbell Society (North America) and other Clan Campbell Society sites around the world.

Scottish

Flags of Scotland
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Flags of Scotland. The Saltire, also known as the St. Andrews's Cross. The Royal Standard, also known as the Lion Rampant.
Argyll, Scotland
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Argyll is an area on the west coast of Scotland and the birthplace of the Scottish nation.
The Jacobite Era
Mark Sutherland-Fisher
History of the Jacobite Era
The Kilt
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
From a symbol of partisan dissent to Scotland's national ceremonial dress.
Highland Attire
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Traditional attire of the Highlands of Scotland.
Ladies Sash Etiquette
Compiled by our Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
The proper ways for a lady to wear a tartan sash. Left shoulder, right shoulder, bow on the hip, or around the waist.
Bagpipes
Clan Campbell Society (North America)
Journal of the Clan Campbell Society (North America), Vol. 47, No. 2
The Scottish Great Highland bagpipes are the best known in the Anglophone world; however, bagpipes have been played for a millennium or more throughout large parts of Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia, including Anatolia, the Caucasus, and around the Persian Gulf.
Links
Compiled by our Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Links to Scottish clans.

Clan Campbell Music

A few notes

The original instrument of the Gael was the clarsach, or "Celtic harp." It was to accompaniment by the clarsach that the seanachies would recite their stories in the halls of the Chiefs. But the instrument that most people connect with Scots heritage is the bagpipes. While bellows driven pipes are traditional in northern England and the lowlands of Scotland, it is the great Highland pipes that are played when on parade and which have a place in the history of the clans. To the clans, these were also known as the great "Highland warpipes," as they were played to incite warriors during battle.

Animated piper graphic.Clans and prominent families had their own pipers, usually a hereditary position for members of a specific family. Most notable were the MacCrimmons, hereditary pipers to the Macleods of Dunvegan.

The Campbells were no different. A family of Campbells were hereditary pipers to the Campbells of Mochaster. The progenitor of this family of Campbells is said to have been sent to study with Patrick òg MacCrimmon himself.

The music most closely associated with the Highland pipes is Piobaireachd, or classical pipe music. Piobaireachd is referred to as Cèol Mòr, or "great music." While the pipe tunes with which more people are familiar are referred to as Cèol Beag, or "little music."

Laments, salutes, and gatherings are most common in Piobaireachd, all commemorating specific events. Piobaireachd does not follow a tempo, but is expressed by note duration and following developing themes. It is unlike any other music in existence.

Clan Campbell has a wealth of music associated with the clan. What follows is but a short listing:

The Campbells Are Coming

No tune is more associated with the clan than The Campbells Are Coming, the words of which are said to have been composed about the Jacobite uprising of 1715. The Gaelic name of the tune is Baile Ionaraora (the town of Inveraray) and the words in the Gaelic reflect the feelings of the piper-composer who apparently was less than enamored with the hospitality he experienced as the piper at a local wedding:

Bha mi air banais am Baile Ionaraora,
Bha mi air banais am Baile Ionaraora,
Bha mi air banais am Baile IIonaraora,
Banais na bochdainn 's gun oirr' ach am maorach.

I was at a wedding in the town of Inveraray,
I was at a wedding in the town of Inveraray,
I was at a wedding in the town of Inveraray,
Most wretched of weddings, with nothing but shellfish.

However, these are the words normally associated with the tune.

The Campbells are coming Hoo-Ra, Hoo-Ra!
The Campbells are coming Hoo-Ra, Hoo-Ra!
The Campbells are coming to bonnie LochLeven
The Campbells are coming Hoo-Ra, Hoo-Ra!

Upon the Lomonds I lay, I lay,
Upon the Lomonds I lay, I lay,
I lookit down to bonnie Lochleven
And saw three perches play-hay-hay!

The Great Argyll he goes before,
He makes the cannons and guns to roar,
With sound o'trumpet, pipe and drum,
The Campbells are coming, Hoo-Ra, Hoo-Ra!

The Campbells they are a' in arms,
Their loyal faith and truth to show,
With banners rattling in the wind,
The Campbells are coming Hoo-Ra, Hoo-Ra!