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Articles of Interest

Clan Campbell

Information
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Real information about the Clan Campbell
History
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Clan Campbell history, some things may surprise you.
Tartans
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
The four tartans of the Clan Campbell: Campbell, Campbell of Loudoun, Campbell of Breadalbane, Campbell of Cawdor.
Septs
Alistair Campbell of Airds, Unicorn Pursuivant of Arms
A History of Clan Campbell
Detailed information about the septs of Clan Campbell. Could you be part of Clan Campbell?
DNA Project
Kevin Campbell and Joel Campbell
Information about the Campbell DNA Project, a link to the Campbell DNA
Tales
Collected by CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Tales attributed to the Clan Campbell.
Music
Collected by CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Music attributed to the Clan Campbell.
Links
Compiled by the Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Links to various regions of the Clan Campbell Society (North America) and other Clan Campbell Society sites around the world.

Scottish

Flags of Scotland
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Flags of Scotland. The Saltire, also known as the St. Andrews's Cross. The Royal Standard, also known as the Lion Rampant.
Argyll, Scotland
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Argyll is an area on the west coast of Scotland and the birthplace of the Scottish nation.
The Jacobite Era
Mark Sutherland-Fisher
History of the Jacobite Era
The Kilt
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
From a symbol of partisan dissent to Scotland's national ceremonial dress.
Highland Attire
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Traditional attire of the Highlands of Scotland.
Ladies Sash Etiquette
Compiled by our Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
The proper ways for a lady to wear a tartan sash. Left shoulder, right shoulder, bow on the hip, or around the waist.
Bagpipes
Clan Campbell Society (North America)
Journal of the Clan Campbell Society (North America), Vol. 47, No. 2
The Scottish Great Highland bagpipes are the best known in the Anglophone world; however, bagpipes have been played for a millennium or more throughout large parts of Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia, including Anatolia, the Caucasus, and around the Persian Gulf.
Links
Compiled by our Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Links to Scottish clans.

Laddies Tartan Sash Etiquette

Picture of Campbell sash

The method of wearing sashes or light scarves had customary significance even two centuries ago, and although the wearing of sashes in any particular manner is of no legal significance whatsoever nowadays, ladies may feel more comfortable knowing that tradition is being observed!

The manner of wearing tartan sashes or light scarves had customary significance even two centuries ago, and whilst the wearing of sashes in any particular manner has, so far, no legal significance, a due respect for tradition suggests that uniform practice, and implication consistent with custom, is desirable. The difference methods undermentioned to wearing such are appropriate for ladies in different circumstances. These suggestions are based on a careful study of old portraits, prints and traditional practice. Styles 1, 2, and 3 have the approval of Sir Thomas Innes, Lord Lyon King of Arms (1945 - 1969). They also appear in Frank Adams' book The Clans Septs and Regiments of the Scottish Highlands and in Tartans and Highland Dress by MacKinnon of Dunakin.

Ilustratiion of Clanswoman style sash etiquette.
Style 1.
(back view)

Style 1

Clanswoman:

• A woman of the clan or sept surnames by birth or marriage.

The sash is worn over the right shoulder, across the breast, and is secured by a pin or small brooch on the shoulder.

Ilustratiion of Chieftainess style sash etiquette.
Style 2.
(back view)

Style 2

Chieftainess:

• The wife of a clan chief or the wife of a Colonel of a Scottish Regiment.

A slightly wider sash, worn over the left shoulder, across the right breast, and secured with a brooch on the left shoulder.



Ilustratiion of thhe style of sash etiquette for women who married outside of their clan and wish to honor their birth clan.
Style 3.
(front view)

Style 3

Married Outside of Her Clan:

• Ladies married out of their clan but who wish to use their original clan tartan.

The sash, usually longer than Style 1, is worn over the right shoulder, secured there with a pin, and fastened in a large bow on the left hip.

Ilustratiion of thhe style of sash etiquette for women who are Scottish Country Dancers.
Style 4.
(back view)

Style 4

Scottish Country Dancers

• Or where the lady wishes to keep the front of her dress clear of the sash (as, for example, when wearing the ribbon of a chivalric order, or any orders and decorations).

This style is similar to the belted plaid, and is really a small earasaid. It is buttoned on at the back of the waist, or is held by a small belt, and is secured at the right shoulder by a pin or small brooch, so that the ends fall backwards from the right shoulder and swing at the back of the right arm

Members of the Royal Scottish Country Dance Society have been granted permission by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, to wear their sashes on the left shoulder. This is an honor bestowed upon the Society because she is Patron. (Electric Scotland)