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Articles of Interest

Clan Campbell

Information
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Real information about the Clan Campbell
History
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Clan Campbell history, some things may surprise you.
Tartans
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
The four tartans of the Clan Campbell: Campbell, Campbell of Loudoun, Campbell of Breadalbane, Campbell of Cawdor.
Septs
Alistair Campbell of Airds, Unicorn Pursuivant of Arms
A History of Clan Campbell
Detailed information about the septs of Clan Campbell. Could you be part of Clan Campbell?
DNA Project
Kevin Campbell and Joel Campbell
Information about the Campbell DNA Project, a link to the Campbell DNA
Tales
Collected by CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Tales attributed to the Clan Campbell.
Music
Collected by CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Music attributed to the Clan Campbell.
Links
Compiled by the Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Links to various regions of the Clan Campbell Society (North America) and other Clan Campbell Society sites around the world.

Scottish

Flags of Scotland
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Flags of Scotland. The Saltire, also known as the St. Andrews's Cross. The Royal Standard, also known as the Lion Rampant.
Argyll, Scotland
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Argyll is an area on the west coast of Scotland and the birthplace of the Scottish nation.
The Jacobite Era
Mark Sutherland-Fisher
History of the Jacobite Era
The Kilt
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
From a symbol of partisan dissent to Scotland's national ceremonial dress.
Highland Attire
CCS(NA) Region 1
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Traditional attire of the Highlands of Scotland.
Ladies Sash Etiquette
Compiled by our Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
The proper ways for a lady to wear a tartan sash. Left shoulder, right shoulder, bow on the hip, or around the waist.
Bagpipes
Clan Campbell Society (North America)
Journal of the Clan Campbell Society (North America), Vol. 47, No. 2
The Scottish Great Highland bagpipes are the best known in the Anglophone world; however, bagpipes have been played for a millennium or more throughout large parts of Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia, including Anatolia, the Caucasus, and around the Persian Gulf.
Links
Compiled by our Webmaster
Special to CCSRegion1.org
Links to Scottish clans.

Flags of Scotland

Image of the Saltire, also known as St. Andrew's Cross.The Flag of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: bratach na h-Alba; Scots: Banner o Scotland), also known as St. Andrew's Cross or the Saltire, is the national flag of Scotland. As the national flag, the Saltire, rather than the Royal Standard of Scotland (also known as the Lion Rampant), is the correct flag for all individuals and corporate bodies to fly. The Lion Rampant is actually the Royal Standard of the King or Queen of Scots, and therefore should be flown by those representing the monarchy in Scotland.

Image of the Royal Standard, also known as the Lion-Rampant.Legend has it that the flag, the oldest in Europe and the Commonwealth, originated in a battle fought close by the East Lothian village of Athelstaneford. The date of this conflict is believed to have been 832 A.D., almost 1,200 years ago.

An army of Picts under Angus MacFergus, High King of Alba, aided by a contingent of Scots led by Eochiadh, King of Dal Riada (Kenneth MacAlpin's grandfather) were on a punitive raid into the Lothians.

At that time, the territory was under Northumbrian control and the invading army found itself pursued by a larger force of Angles and Saxons led by Æthelstan. The Albannach/Scots were caught and stood to face their pursuers in the area of Markle, East Linton, just to the north of the modern village of Athelstaneford.

On the eve of the battle, Angus, fearing a disastrous outcome, prayed to God and prayed to Saint Andrew, asking for help in defeating his adversaries. Angus made a solemn vow that if Andrew intervened and allowed him to win the day, he would adopt him as the Patron Saint of Alba. Andrew then appeared to Angus later that night in a dream and assured him of victory.

Image of clouds in a blue sky forming the cross of the Saltire.On the field of battle the next morning, a cloud formation in the shape of a huge white saltire (the diagonal X shaped cross on which St Andrew had been martyred) appeared against the blue sky.

Emboldened by this apparently divine intervention, the Picts and Scots took to the field and despite their numeric disadvantage, stayed the course - eventually winning the battle when Æthelstan was killed and his forces fled the field.

Angus honored his pre-battle pledge and duly appointed Andrew as the Patron Saint of Alba. When Kenneth MacAlpin, who may have been present with his grandfather at the battle, later united the Picts and Scots, naming the entity Scotland, Andrew become the patron saint of the united realm. 28 years later, Kenneth MacAlpin, King of Scots and Picts, Ard-righ Albainn, was laid to rest on the holy island of Iona in 860 A.D.

The white saltire set against a celestial blue background is said to have been adopted as the design of the flag of Scotland on the basis of this ancient legend.